Friday, 14 December 2012

Discovery of Historic Camp Site at Antarctica



A campsite used by a group led by geologist Raymond Priestle during the 1912 "Race to the Pole" was recently discovered by a National Science Foundation-supported research team. Priestley's was the second study of the summit region of Mt. Erebus; the first occurred from 1907-1909.


More than 100 years after two groups of men raced each other to be the first to reach the South Pole, modern-day explorers have re-discovered what appears to be one of their camp sites on the slopes of the world's southernmost volcano.


Norwegian Roald Amundsen and Englishman Robert Falcon Scott were the explorers who led teams of their countrymen on grueling journeys across the frigid continent in an effort to be the first to go where no man had gone before. Amundsen won the race, reaching the pole on Dec. 14, 2011. Scott also made it there, on Jan. 17, 1912, but perished with the remainder of his crew on the arduous track back to the edge of the continent.



Scott and his team camped on the slopes of Mount Erebus, the southernmost volcano, during their journey. The spot was known as "the highest camp," according to a National Science Foundation release.





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